14 Jan

Resolutions are Bogus

When January rolls around, many people declare a new year resolution.

“I’m going to lose weight!”

“I’m going to eat better!”

“I’m going to spend more time with my family!”

We resolve to change something about ourselves that’s inherently become a part of who we are. But many of these “resolutioners” fall short in their pursuit of a “new year, new me”.

Let’s be honest with ourselves for a minute. We all know there’s really a slim chance we’ll actually stick with our resolution. No matter how good our intentions are, year after year we still fail and none of us ever try to figure out why we fail. And what’s worse, none of us attempt to prevent the failure. Why? Because we’re resolutioners, not achievers.

“Resolutioners” versus “achievers”

Resolutioners have the goal to change something in their life, and they start with the resolve to do so, but they don’t plan ahead. This is why we fail, and fail quickly, especially with fitness goals. We join the gym in January, work out without a set schedule or trainer for a couple weeks, and expect to see results. I’m guilty of this myself. Then when things don’t satisfy our vision immediately, we lose heart and quit.

Achievers, on the other hand, plan for their goal. They have the same resolve to change something in their life, but they know what they have to do to complete it. They do the research, they plan ahead, and they are the ones that are at the gym throughout the year following their workout routine.

So how do you become an “achiever”?
  1. Drop the date. You shouldn’t be relying on a date to tell you when to change. If you’re motivated today, start today! No sense in waiting until tomorrow to do what you can today. If you want to change your business model, set time aside to organize your thoughts and evaluate your system, then set a meeting to discuss it with your role model.
  2. Choose a role model. If you don’t already have one, you need to find one in the area of expertise you’re looking to change. You can’t do something you’ve never done before without somewhere to go for inspiration, ideas, and advice. Your role model knows the pitfalls that you face and how to avoid them. They know how big the little steps are. They know what path you should follow to achieve your goals.
  3. Define your routine. Follow your role model’s routine but develop it around you. Everyone is different and starts at different places, so don’t be afraid to start small until you reach a more comfortable level of involvement in your change. And don’t think that you can’t alter your routine to fit your schedule. Trying to run a half marathon involves following a training schedule. You research a running routine and stick to it, but you can’t let it control your life. It’s okay to swap the day where you run with the day that you relax when you have something come up in your schedule. But don’t let modification turn into avoidance. One of the easiest ways to prevent this pitfall is with a partner.
  4. Surround yourself with the right people. Choose those that want you to succeed and want to succeed in changing themselves at the same time. This symbiotic relationship does wonders for accomplishing a goal. It has helped our team tremendously. You’ll keep each other accountable, grow together and even push each other beyond what you could imagine for yourself. This doesn’t have to be a spouse, work partner or close friend. It can be someone at the gym or even a long-distance third-party. Just make sure they have the attitude you need to push you to succeed. No great athlete, businessman, parent, etc. achieves greatness on their own.
Change is hard, but not as hard as intentionally changing yourself.

It’s okay to set goals at the start of the year. It’s even okay to not accomplish them right away. But it’s not okay to give up without even properly trying. Be aware of the difference between being a resolutioner and an achiever. Resolutions are bogus. Intentions with the right plan and people in place will help keep you on track to a life-changing year.

Written by Courtney Miller

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